Re: Server with 3 NICs

From: SuperGumby [SBS MVP] (not_at_your.nellie)
Date: 07/01/04

  • Next message: Phil S.: "Re: Server with 3 NICs"
    Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2021 08:00:47 +1000
    

    the private address ranges are not 'by tradition', they are specifically
    designated by an RFC
    http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1918.html

     The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) has reserved the
       following three blocks of the IP address space for private internets:

         10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)
         172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix)
         192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix)

       We will refer to the first block as "24-bit block", the second as
       "20-bit block", and to the third as "16-bit" block. Note that (in
       pre-CIDR notation) the first block is nothing but a single class A
       network number, while the second block is a set of 16 contiguous
       class B network numbers, and third block is a set of 256 contiguous
       class C network numbers.

    notice the term 'in pre-CIDR notation'
    http://infocenter.guardiandigital.com/manuals/IDDS/node9.html

    in the old days classful addressing was required but today _most_ devices
    understand classless addressing. Note the word 'most'.

    "Phil S." <nospam-m-phil-NoSpam@123.net> wrote in message
    news:OIeASI7XEHA.2216@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Per W.
    >
    > I don't understand. Could you expand please.
    >
    > In SBS 2003, with 2 NIC configuration one could use any, repeat any IP
    > address and mask you want for internal network configuration. It is not
    > routed to the external world. It is completely internal to your own
    > network. (that is why we use NAT)
    >
    > Worked at a school district that used building number first octet, then
    > building floor, followed by classroom, then seat. Worked great, and had
    no
    > problems. Again, completely with in local intranet. Last I heard, it was
    > important to use IP scheme other than 10.x.x.x or 192.x.x.x for heavy used
    > routed wireless LANs.
    >
    > I thought that it was only by tradition, and only tradition, that we
    started
    > using the 10.x.x.x and 192.x.x.x for internal networks. If this has
    > changed, please pass the word.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Phil S.
    >
    > "Per W." <pwbuf@tiscali.no> wrote in message
    > news:taYEc.20516$Vf.1114353@news000.worldonline.dk...
    > >
    > > <Ineedtoknow@knowledge.com> skrev i melding
    > > news:2452401c45f82$c61923a0$a301280a@phx.gbl...
    > > > I have a SBS 2003 Server with 3 Nics, running ISA 2000.
    > > > 1 Nic for the LAN 10.0.10.120
    > > > 1 Nic is for the Internet Connection 10.0.100.120
    > > > Everythings was working fine
    > > > Now I am enabling the third Nic for a second LAN segment
    > > > that comes from a router. IP is 10.0.100.121.
    > > > In the switch where 10.0.100.121 is there are 3 Server
    > > > including this one, and a PC. I can ping everything but
    > > > this server; I cann't access this server thru 10.0.100.121
    > > > What am I doing wrong, is the IP configuration the
    > > > problem? Or is ISA preventing this to happen?
    > > >
    > > > In Networking Advanced, Server Local Area Connection is
    > > > first, then Network Connection2, then Network Connection.
    > > > Here is ipconfig/all info.
    > > >
    > >
    > > Why use 10.x.x.x ?? The 10.x.x.x should use 255.0.0.0 mask and then all
    of
    > > the network is in the same subnet. There is some routers that dont allow
    > to
    > > use 10.x.x.x and 255.255.255.0 mask. So the best thing you can do is use
    > > 192.168.x.x with 255.255.255.0 mask and use different subnet on every
    > > network, thats the best solutions.
    > >
    > > /Per W.
    > >
    > >
    >


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